Nature protection technologies

3.5.2. Road construction

Part 3. ASH AND SLAG HANDLING

3.5. Applications of ash and slag from power coals

3.5.2. Road construction

3.5.2.1. Standartization and perspectives of using ash-and-slag mixtures from ttps in road construction in Russia

V.V. Sirotyuk, Siberian State Automobile and Highway Academy (SibADI), Omsk, Russia

In the paper important factors and solutions of a problem on using ash-and-slag materials in road construction are presented. Importance of development of normative and technical documentation on using ash and slag from thermal power plants is defined.

Part 3. ASH AND SLAG HANDLING

3.5. Applications of ash and slag from power coals

3.5.2. Road construction

3.5.2.2. Standardization of combustion by-products for road construction in Poland

T. Szczygielski, Polska Unia UPS – Polish CCP Union

 Utilization of ashes from power generation in road construction in Poland begun in 50-ies, soon after the power plants fired with pulverized coal started their operations. First industrial (branch) standards started to appear in 60-ties and 70-ties, with subsequent revisions. Last major revision of standards regulating the use of ashes in road construction was in the years 1997 – 98 and these revised standards are still in force. 

Part 3. ASH AND SLAG HANDLING

3.5. Applications of ash and slag from power coals

3.5.2. Road construction

3.5.2.3. Monitoring results of an experimental area of roadbed made of ash-and-slag mixture

V.V. Sirotyuk, Y.V. Ivanov, Siberian State Automobile and Highway Academy, Omsk, Russia

V.R. Shevtsov, OJSC "TGC-11", Novosibirsk, Russia

 Analysis of the Perspective Plan of large-tonnage usage of ash-and-slag of OJCS "TGC-11" TPPs for the period from 2011 to 2020 shows that vertical land planning, liquidation of subsurface management consequences and road construction are the ways of large-tonnage usage of ash-and-slag materials. Roadbed construction takes the third place according to volumes of TPPs' ash-and-slag usage (from 20 up to 100 thous. m3 per 1 km). Effective normative documents allow using ash-and-slag mixtures for mentioned purpose [1] but multiple "myths" about "enormous harm of ash-and-slag wastes (such as radiation, radium, extra frost swelling, difference in properties) and lack of application experience of such materials lead to vigilance of the companies, negative attitude of the engineers and contractors of  road projects.

Part 3. ASH AND SLAG HANDLING

3.5. Use of ash and slag from power coals

3.5.2. Road construction

3.5.2.4. High volume of calcareous fly ash for the production of a hydraulic binder for road pavements

C. Charalampidou, I. Papayianni — Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

M. Chaniotakis Titan Cement S.A, Greece

S. Tsimas — National Technical University of Athens, Greece

The construction of road pavement with concrete seems very advantageous from technical point of view especially for heavy load transportations. However, the use of concrete pavement often results in higher initial cost in comparison to asphalt one though the service life of concrete road is generally longer.

The development of a commercial low cost hydraulic binder of adequate strength capacity will contribute to the reduction of the initial cost of concrete pavement.

Part 3. ASH AND SLAG HANDLING

3.5. Applications of ash and slag from power coals

3.5.2.5. Mixed type binding systems. A sustainable alternative for RCC road pavements

I. Papayianni, E. Anastasiou, M. Papachristoforou, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

 The strength potential of alternative binders such as fly ashes, slags, natural pozzolans and metakaolin is not usually exploited to the maximum since their physicomechanical characteristics are rarely understood in detail. Provided that a thorough knowledge of the characteristics of supplementary cementing materials exists, the combination of high volume of them in a binding system could offer a sustainable alternative. In this paper, a binding system with high volume of calcareous fly ash and natural pozzolan and only with 20 % by mass Portland clinker has been used for the bedding of part of a rural road, constructed by EGNATIA ODOS S.A. in Greece. The concrete mixture and its properties in fresh and hardened state, as well as its technical details, are reported. Problems during construction are mentioned and short and long term test results concerning the concrete road pavement performance are also given.

Part 3. ASH AND SLAG HANDLING

3.5. Applications of ash and slag from power coals

3.5.2. Road construction

3.5.2.6. Life Cycle Cost Analysis of road pavement with Greek High Calcium Fly Ash Roller Compacted Concrete

L. Apostolakaki, I. Papayianni, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Road pavement construction is a very high capital investment, usually of public funds. It should be based on economic and environmental protection criteria. Therefore, Life Cycle Cost Analysis is necessary for selecting the most suitable for the case design of pavement. In Greece, until now, the experience in construction of rigid pavements is very limited. Flexible asphalt pavements dominate although the great inclinations, the hot climate in summer and longer service life of concrete favor concrete pavements.

Part 3. ASH AND SLAG HANDLING

3.5. Applications of ash and slag from power coals

3.5.2. Road construction

3.5.2.7. Development of ferrocement matrix by using calcareous fly ash and ladle furnace slag as pozzolanic admixtures

I. Papayianni, M. Papachristoforou, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

  Ferrocement is defined as reinforced mortar with multiple layers of steel mesh encapsulated in mortar matrix. It is widely used for housing units, flat or corrugated roofing sheets as well as other structural components. Ferrocement seems to be an alternative for roofing elements supporting photovoltaic cells. Mortar is usually injected and therefore, fluidity of it is the important criteria for the design of the mortar mixture apart from the required strength.